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Facebook: it’s OK to be yourself

If you have an inbox, chances are by now you’ve been invited by someone to join Facebook and/or hook up as their friend on Facebook. And me, I can’t get enough of it! I and many of my friends are giving it a lot of love at the moment. And why not? There’s no better way to dig up (stalk?) old friends, and there’s a lot of toys (sorry, third-party applications) to play with as well.

I first heard about Facebook through a brother of mine who pestered me to get onto it. He graduated from Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada), which now, as it turns out, has its own Facebook dedicated server. Which makes sense, since it was first conceived for schools and universities as a way for alumni to keep/stay in touch.

Work/non-work personalities

But what of the whole work/non-work tension? Lee Hopkins writes about the dilemma of having a personal profile potentially (and embarrassingly?) available to your professional network as well as your non-professional circles. What if you’re going for a respectable job at a respectable company, and your potential boss finds you on your Facebook page as a beer-swilling hoon who’s into Primus, photographing road-kill and collecting traffic signs?

But hold on folks: I don’t think we need all this paranoia. Anyone who spends a few minutes on Facebook looking at a few pages will see the following: loads of photos of smiling people at parties, people on holiday, and pictures of their kids (and sorry you young ‘uns… more and more grown-ups are getting onto Facebook now, get used to it). There’s loads of ‘wall’ messages with friends saying hi and how are you.

It’s all very very normal.

I say be yourself; anyone you’re out to impress by being someone other than yourself is going to see the Real You eventually, aren’t they?

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Workforce Guardian website

Screenshot of the Workforce Guardian home page

Screenshot of the Workforce Guardian home page

Workforce Guardian is an online application to help businesses hire, manage and exit employees. The production of this website was by-the-book in terms of audience analysis (carried out by PTG Global), stakeholder consultation, rigorous information architecture, website optimisation and content strategy. The visual design and W3C standards-compliant XHTML was outsourced to Reactive, who really knew what they were doing. The website has also been tuned for best search engine tastiness by another external partner, who also perform ongoing search optimisation.

Update: after the website was first launched, I re-did the Products/product options index page with an accordion-style product comparison feature, which opened up the details of the features much more efficiently for people to view and decide which edition was best for them.

Another note: the website – especially the home page – has changed quite a lot since it was first launched.

Go to: workforceguardian.com.au

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Workforce Guardian identity

The Workforce Guardian identity

The Workforce Guardian identity

The Workforce Guardian logo features a double-shield design in blue-and-green freshness with a contemporary approachable typeface.

Workforce Guardian is an online application to help businesses hire, manage and exit employees. It’s geared towards small businesses who usually don’t have the time or the legal expertise to confidently produce legally bullet-proof employment contracts and to deal with many HR-related issues that larger companies with an HR department can deal with.

The design of this logo involved distilling a brand exploration exercise with the key business stakeholders and a marketing consultant into a pure statement of Workforce Guardian’s brand: employment relations expertise when you need it. Since the Workforce Guardian product is an online application, it was tempting to follow the path of many Web 2.0-ish design trends, but the company character and its target audiences were very different from, say, YouTube and Facebook.

The double-shield represents Workforce Guardian working with their customers, protecting the rights of both employer and employee. The green colour moves the tone away from being too conservative and – with employment relations legislation being a hot topic in the news at the time – too political.